Tag Archives: hidamari sketch

Twelve Days: Nine Ladies Dancing

Or: The End of the Second Era

Yes, I'm using a screenshot of Sae and Natsume for Hiro and Sae's graduation OVA. I see no problem with this.

At the end of the first era, we bore witness to the exiting of Arisawa. Arisawa is a third year whom we meet by coincidence when revising for her university entrance exams late one night. We see her again once said exams are taken and passed. The third time is at her graduation. She is seen off with a congratulations and a high-five. Arisawa’s exit is confident and forward-facing.

The second era ends with the exiting of Sae and Hiro. This exit is neither as confident, nor as forward-facing. There are tears, there is uncertainty, there is melancholy.

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by | December 17, 2013 · 8:45 am

Twelve Days: Ten Lords-a-Leaping

Or: On Late Discoveries

Not the picture I wanted, but there's a major lack of anything Ichiroh! floating around. So it was either this, or dodgy phone camera photographs.

On the whole, the fellows at Yen Press are fairly decent chaps. They have recently completed their occidental publication of all Haruhi Suzumiya light novels written to date. Book Girl[1] is silly but fun, and is set to similarly conclude it’s main story early in the new year. Nor can we forget their publication of Spice and Wolf[2]A Bride’s StoryBunny DropKobatoOlymposInu x Boku SS[3]Thermae Romae, or Yotsuba.

Aside those mentioned above lies a style of manga one would not immediately assume anyone in their right mind would publish on this side of the world. Yet they have, and I’m immensely happy they do.

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by | December 16, 2013 · 8:45 am

The Sigh of Ume Aoki: Anime and the Irretrievable Past

‘A voice, fleeting, to the sky, the top of the sky, that’ll someday vanish…’

Hidamari Sketch is primarily known for both its relaxed nature and Ume Aoki’s distinctive style. The series started out as a 4-koma, featured in the magazine Manga Time Kirara Carat, aimed at the seinen demographic, and could arguably be considered emblematic of the format’s light comedic air. Yet, as I have waxed lyrical on before, not all 4-koma need amount to soothing fluff.

At a glance, the series might appear to be an example of an ensemble cast, especially if one first approaches the series via the anachronistically-ordered anime. Yet, as one soon realises, the series is essentially a coming of age story centred about the character Yuno, and so we follow our curiously-shaped-hair-clip-wearing heroine on her journey through her final three years of school.

For the first three volumes we become accustomed to the cast and, aside from a story about a visiting stray cat, all seems happy and carefree. In the fourth volume, however, a slight shadow is cast. A hint of things yet to come.

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